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Cherokee Nation supports new Jack Brown Center; honors citizens

01/16/2013
January 16, 2013
Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden, left, and Principal Chief Bill John Baker, right, honor Stan Phillips, of Westville, for embodying the Cherokee spirit of service by helping others in need.
Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden, left, and Principal Chief Bill John Baker, right, honor Stan Phillips, of Westville, for embodying the Cherokee spirit of service by helping others in need.

Add pic TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — The Cherokee Nation Tribal Council approved $2.2 million Monday to the tribe’s capital projects fund for the construction of a new Jack Brown Center. 

The new facility will be located on the western part of the Male Seminary Recreation Center campus, where land is currently being cleared for an end-of-year completion. The Jack Brown Center is a residential center for Native American youth to treat drug and alcohol dependency.

During the Jan. 14 Tribal Council meeting, members also approved a resolution of recognition for Cherokee citizen and NFL Patriot wide receiver Wes Welker. Welker’s grandmother lives in Sequoyah County within the Cherokee Nation’s tribal jurisdiction. Welker, 31, is a Heritage Hall graduate from Oklahoma City.

“We want to recognize Wes Welker, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, for his outstanding athletic accomplishments as the New England Patriots wide receiver,” said Tribal Council member Janelle Fulbright. “Welker is tied with Jerry Rice in NFL history with 17 games of at least 10 catches. Welker is on pace to break the tie with Chris Carter as the only player to catch 120 passes in a season twice. Welker has the most receptions in the past six seasons.”

In other business, Buck Charles George, of Tahlequah, was approved as a Cherokee Nation Businesses board member. George is the owner of George Rental Property, George Cattle and Land Company, GT Storage and Spring Hollow Feed Mill and Spring Hollow Store.

During the meeting, Principal Chief Bill John Baker also recognized Stan Phillips and Westville Volunteer Fire Chief Eddie Roberts and his team for embodying the Cherokee spirit of service by helping others in need.

In October, Phillips, a health care professional, arrived on the scene of a car accident involving a 24-year-old and 10-year-old girl. Phillips offered his shoes to the 10-year-old, whose bare feet were bloodied from the broken glass. He kept the girl calm until first responders arrived to extract her from the car wreckage.

“Our deepest thanks and gratitude go to Stan, who is the son of Jiggs Phillips, a man many of us know from his more than 20 years of service on the Cherokee Nation Tribal Council,” Chief Baker said.

Roberts and his team of volunteer firefighters extracted the girl from the car.

“I can only think of two times in 18 years that anyone has expressed any appreciation,” Roberts said of the team’s 230 emergency calls per year. “We appreciate the Cherokee Nation. For us, this is overwhelming.”

The next Tribal Council meeting is slated for 6 p.m., Feb. 11, at the W.W. Keeler Complex in Tahlequah.


Cherokee Nation News Release
Julie Hubbard - 918-207-3896
communications@cherokee.org
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