Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan

The Cherokee Nation Comprehensive Cancer Control (CNCCC) Project assists in the development of networks and collaboration that produce an infrastructure for a comprehensive approach to cancer within the Cherokee Nation. Since 2003, coalition members and partners have come together to discuss the burden of cancer in Cherokee Nation. Coalition members and partners include local, regional, state and national representatives committed to identifying areas of cancer concern, planning interventions, prioritizing greatest areas of identified need, and then implementing identified strategies and/or providing needed resources. This is the second edition of the Cherokee Nation Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan and will serve, like the first, as an information resource for health care professionals and community members, as well as a tool for the Cherokee Nation Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition and its respective entities. The coalition is committed to the process of enhancing infrastructure for comprehensive cancer control in the Cherokee Nation with the ultimate goal of reducing morbidity and mortality among the Cherokee community.

Cherokee Nation Environmental Services

 The Cherokee Nation’s Office of Environmental Services is a member of the Inter-Tribal Environmental Council (ITEC), which is an organization that was developed by Cherokee Nation to protect the health of Native Americans, their natural resources, and their environment as it is related to air, land and water. This organization is designed to provide support, technical assistance, program development and training to member tribes.

 
The Cherokee Nation has been recognized for their leadership in environmental services and received an award from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for being the first tribe to develop and administer a lead based paint training and certificate program.
 
Members of the Cherokee Nation are also involved with the Native American Issues Subcommittee, who are charged with identifying issues and concerns specific to Native Americans that reside within the boundaries of the Tar Creek superfund site, which has been identified as the #1 Superfund Site in the Nation. They are tasked with identifying needed federal assistance to resolve issues and concerns identified by the subcommittee and to propose legislative, administrative, and or congressional actions needed to assist tribal organizations in resolving their unique concerns.