Education

Arts Outreach

Arts programs for schools and community groups are offered through the Cherokee Arts Institute.

Cherokee Ambassadors

The Cherokee Nation's ambassadors serve as goodwill representatives for the tribe. During the year they appear at community meetings, participate in parades, visit schools and take part in various special events throughout the Cherokee Nation as well as at events held in other states.

Cherokee National Youth Choir

The Cherokee National Youth Choir performs traditional songs in the Cherokee language. The choir was founded in 2000 as a way to keep our youth interested in and involved with Cherokee language and culture.

Co-Partners JOM

The Cherokee Nation Co-Partner Program, also known as Johnson O’Malley (JOM), is designed to provide supplemental and/or operational support to public schools within Cherokee Nation boundries serving eligible Indian students from three years of age through 12th grade.

College Resources

The Cherokee Nation's College Resource Program awards scholarships to selected Cherokee Nation Tribal tribal Citizens citizens pursuing degrees at a colleges or university accredited with Carnegie units.

Directed Studies Program

The purpose of the competitive Cherokee Directed Studies Scholarship Program is to provide financial assistance to deserving students pursuing higher education in a specific study area aimed at strengthening the Cherokee Nation government and economy.

Head Start - Early Childhood Unit

The Head Start and Early Head Start programs are based on the premise that children 6 weeks to five years old from income eligible families can benefit from a social and educational program.

I Believe

Brian Jackson, AKA the "I Believe Guy", is a Cherokee, Creek and Seminole Native American who uses his own personal true stories to illustrate turning life's struggles into successes, "Motivating Today's Youth to Believe in Tomorrow".

Immersion School

A language preservation program designed to revitalize the Cherokee language beginning with our children.

Language Technology

When Sequoyah, a Cherokee silversmith and statesman, invented the Cherokee syllabary back in 1821, the latest technology for communicating was the printing press. Many people may not realize that some of today’s hottest technology, including those popular devices whose names start with an “i,” also offer the option of communicating using the Cherokee syllabary.

Remember The Removal Bike Ride

Covering nearly 1,000 miles. bike riders representing the Cherokee Nation ride the "Trail of Tears" remembering the thousands who were forced to make that trek from their homeland to "Indian Territory" in what is now Oklahoma.

Sequoyah Schools

The Sequoyah school program offers middle and high school education for Native American students in grades 7-12.

Tribal Youth Council

The Cherokee Nation Tribal Youth Council believes that from our youth will come our future leaders.