Cherokee Nation Names Jr. Miss Cherokee

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September 25, 2007

Cherokee Nation Names Jr. Miss Cherokee

The Cherokee Nation recently crowned Jr. Miss Cherokee for 2007-2008.  Pictured are (l-r): Principal Chief Chad Smith; Cori Buther 2nd runner-up; Jr. Miss Cherokee 2007 Feather Smith; Jade Hansen 1st runner-up; and Michelle Locust, Miss Cherokee 2006. 
The Cherokee Nation recently crowned Jr. Miss Cherokee for 2007-2008. Pictured are (l-r): Principal Chief Chad Smith; Cori Buther 2nd runner-up; Jr. Miss Cherokee 2007 Feather Smith; Jade Hansen 1st runner-up; and Michelle Locust, Miss Cherokee 2006.

TAHLEQUAH, OK —Feather Smith of Tahlequah was recently crowned Jr. Miss Cherokee during the Cherokee Nation’s annual Jr. Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition.

       “Our Cherokee communities are very proud of each of the young women that participated in this competition,” said Chad Smith, Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. “It was great to watch these young women display knowledge and understanding of our Cherokee culture. They are all winners in my book.”

              Feather is the daughter of Rex and Marie Smith. She is a senior at Sequoyah Schools and is planning to attend OSU and major in zoology. She loves animals and enjoys playing stickball. In her spare time, she teaches a clay beading class and enjoys basket weaving.

       “I am so honored to have been chosen to represent the Cherokee Nation in the upcoming year,” said Smith. “I realize that I am a role model now for Cherokee youth and will do my best to make the most out of this opportunity.”

The first runner-up was Jade Hansen, the daughter of Woody and Joyce Hansen. Jade attends Kansas High School. The second runner-up was Cori Buther, the daughter of Monica Flyn. Cori is a freshman at Sequoyah Schools.

       Jr. Miss Cherokee will serve as a goodwill ambassador of the Cherokee people, and will have several opportunities to share knowledge of Cherokee culture and history.

       “I want to thank all of the young women who participated in this competition,” said Reba Bruner, coordinator. “I would also like to remind everyone that it is never too early to start preparing for next year’s competition.”